Science & Technology Headlines

New computational tool harnesses big data, deep learning to revea…

A research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has developed an innovative computational tool offering researchers an efficient method for detecting the different ways RNA is pieced together (spliced) when copied from DNA. Because variations in how RNA is spliced play crucial roles in many diseases, this new analytical tool will provide greater capabilities for discovering disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets, even from RNA-sequencing data sets with modest coverage.

 
The largest delta plain in Earth's history…

The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. Its size out-scales modern counterparts by an order of magnitude, and approximates 1% of the total land area of the modern world. And although contenders are found in the rock record, no ancient counterpart exceeds the extent of the Triassic delta plain mapped in the subsurface Barents Sea either.

 
The largest delta plain in Earth's history…

The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. Its size out-scales modern counterparts by an order of magnitude, and approximates 1 percent of the total land area of the modern world. And although contenders are found in the rock record, no ancient counterpart exceeds the extent of the Triassic delta plain mapped in the subsurface Barents Sea either.

 
Groups: EPA has dragged heels on oil dispersant rules…

Environmental groups and women from Alaska and Louisiana say the Environmental Protection Agency has dragged its heels on issuing rules for oil spill dispersants, and they're ready to sue to demand them.

 
Duke University pays $112M to settle faked-research lawsuit…

Duke University will pay $112 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit after federal prosecutors said a research technician's fake data landed millions of dollars in federal grants, the school and the government said Monday.

 
New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the…

Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes that are roughly the same size as your brain, and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, "Gremlins". You're a tarsier— a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. A new virtual reality software, Tarsier Goggles, developed at Dartmouth College, simulates a tarsier's vision and illustrates the adaptive advantage of this animal's oversized eyes. Both the virtual reality build and the team's findings published recently in Evolution: Education and Outreach are available for free online.

 
Satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Veronica along Australia coast…

On March 25, Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move in southerly direction along the coast of Western Australia in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

 
Crisis management: When your celebrity advertising endorser gener…

Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Free University of Berlin published new research in the INFORMS journal Management Science that provides companies with substantiated, actionable insights on strategies for effectively responding to situations where their highly compensated celebrity endorsers generate negative publicity.

 
NASA Updates Spacewalk Assignments, Announces Final Preview Brief…

With the first in a series of three spacewalks successfully completed at the International Space Station, NASA has updated astronaut assignments for the remaining two spacewalks and will preview the third in an upcoming news conference on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

 
The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that…

Evolutionary biologists at McMaster University who study the social lives and behaviour of colony spiders—some of which are docile, others aggressive— have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbours.

 
NASA finds heavy rainfall around Tropical Cyclone Joaninha's cent…

NASA calculated the rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.

 
Wood-based technology creates electricity from heat…

A University of Maryland-led team of researchers has created a heat-to-electricity device that runs on ions and which could someday harness the body's heat to provide energy.

 
Matter waves and quantum splinters…

Physicists in the United States, Austria and Brazil have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending on the frequency of the shaking.

 
New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the…

Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, 'Gremlins.' You're a tarsier -- a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. A new virtual reality (VR) software, Tarsier Goggles, simulates a tarsier's vision and illustrates the adaptive advantage of this animal's oversized eyes.

 
Apple pivot led by star-packed video service…

With Hollywood stars galore, Apple unveiled its streaming video plans Monday along with news and game subscription offerings as part of an effort to shift its focus to digital content and services to break free of its reliance on iPhone sales.

 
Replacing sitting time with physical activity associated with low…

For those who get the least amount of physical activity, replacing a half hour of sitting time with physical activity was associated with up to a nearly 50 percent reduction in mortality, according to a new study.

 
Restoring this enzyme's function protects against heart disease i…

Patients with lupus are at increased risk of heart disease. Exposing endothelial cells -- known to protect against heart disease, in part by producing nitric oxide -- to the serum of patients with lupus decreased nitric oxide production. Administering L-sepiapterin restored that production.

 
Wood-based technology creates electricity from body heat…

A research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity.

 
NASA Television to Broadcast Fifth Meeting of the National Space…

NASA Television and the agency’s website will provide live coverage of the fifth meeting of the National Space Council starting at 1 p.m. EDT Tuesday, March 26.

 
Matter waves and quantum splinters…

Physicists have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending on the frequency of the shaking.

 
The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a…

The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. Geologists are interested in the evolution of this lake and have been investigating its subsurface to reconstruct its biological and geological history.

 
Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein functio…

A machine-learning model computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.

 
The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that…

Evolutionary biologists who study the social lives and behavior of colony spiders -- some of which are docile, others aggressive -- have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbors.

 
Testosterone can help men with hypogonadism lose weight, keep it…

Long-term testosterone therapy can help men with hypogonadism lose weight and maintain their weight loss, researchers report.

 
The stroke care paradox: Close-knit social networks increase dela…

Patients with closer-knit social networks, including family members and spouses, were more likely to delay seeking hospital care for a stroke whereas those with a more dispersed network of acquaintances were more likely to seek care faster.

 
How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests…

A national-scale study of U.S. forests found strong relationships between the diversity of native tree species and the number of nonnative pests that pose economic and ecological threats to the nation's forests.

 
Fossil barnacles, the original GPS, help track ancient whale migr…

Barnacles that hitch rides on the backs of humpback and gray whales not only record details about the whales' yearly travels, they also retain this information after they become fossilized, helping scientists reconstruct the migrations of whale populations millions of years in the past, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study.

 
In 'Killer Robots' debate, Japan shuns fully automated arms…

Japan's ambassador to the United Nations-backed Conference on Disarmament says his country has not developed fully autonomous weapons systems and has no plans to do so.

 
New Jersey orders cleanup of clothing, cookware chemicals…

New Jersey is ordering five companies that manufacture chemicals used to stain-proof clothing and produce non-stick cookware to spend what could be hundreds of millions of dollars to clean up contamination from the substances.

 
Apple includes 300 magazines in subscription news service…

Apple launched a subscription news service Monday that includes more than 300 magazines as part of the iPhone maker's pivot to services.

 
Big U-turn: Key melting Greenland glacier is growing again…

A major Greenland glacier that was one of the fastest shrinking ice and snow masses on Earth is growing again, a new NASA study finds.

 
Researchers measure quantum behavior at room temperature, visible…

Since the historic finding of gravitational waves from two black holes colliding over a billion light years away was made in 2015, physicists are advancing knowledge about the limits on the precision of the measurements that will help improve the next generation of tools and technology used by gravitational wave scientists.

 
The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a…

The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. Geologists are interested in the evolution of this lake and have been investigating its subsurface to reconstruct its biological and geological history. The salty sediments of the Dead Sea are still full of mysteries, in particular regarding the life forms harbored there, commonly called the deep subsurface biosphere.

 
Study finds climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiver…

A University of Oklahoma study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies. More rapid changes in biodiversity are expected in a warmer world. In addition, ecosystem functions and services may become more vulnerable as the structure of an ecosystem is linked to the functions it performs, which may provide positive or negative feedback to climate warming.

 
How hawkish is the Chinese public?

Chinese Communist Party officials often invoke the outrage of the Chinese people when disputing a foreign government's actions or demands. International observers are often skeptical of these claims about the overarching feelings of 1.3 billion people.

 
Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives t…

Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed scientists to access and assess previously undetectable plant microorganisms. Scientists have long known that various plant-associated microorganisms contribute to plant health and productivity but were unable to analyze them in plant seeds due to technical restrictions. Thanks to the enhanced development of high-throughput sequencing methods, plant seed microbiomes have been increasingly studied.

 
House hunting for hellbenders: Pick right-sized rock or be eaten…

For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it.

 
Study examines commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbo…

Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study at the University of Illinois explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the tradeoffs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.

 
Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum comput…

A new method allows the quantum state of atomic "qubits"—the basic unit of information in quantum computers—to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms. Accurately measuring qubit states, which are analogous to the one or zero states of bits in traditional computing, is a vital step in the development of quantum computers. A paper describing the method by researchers at Penn State appears March 25, 2019 in the journal Nature Physics.

 
House hunting for hellbenders…

For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it.

 
Climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiversity…

A study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies. More rapid changes in biodiversity are expected in a warmer world. In addition, ecosystem functions and services may become more vulnerable as the structure of an ecosystem is linked to the functions it performs, which may provide positive or negative feedback to climate warming.

 
Commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbon emissions…

Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the trade-offs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.

 
Race at the edge of the Sun: Ions are faster than atoms…

Ions move faster than atoms in the gas streams of a solar prominence. Scientists have now observed this.

 
Mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils solved…

Scientists have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts.

 
Traffic control of cells…

Researchers develop a hydrogel whose stiffness and permeability to cells can be controlled with light.

 
Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives t…

Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations.

 
Antarctic snowfall dominated by a few extreme snowstorms…

A new study reveals the importance of a small number of intense storms around Antarctica in controlling the amount of snow falling across the continent.

 
Predicting the useful life of batteries with data and AI…

In an advance that could accelerate battery development and improve manufacturing, scientists have found how to accurately predict the useful lifespan of lithium-ion batteries, used in devices from mobile phones to electric cars.

 
Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum comput…

A new method allows the quantum state of atomic 'qubits'--the basic unit of information in quantum computers -- to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms.

 
Handshakes or contracts?

Neighbouring fire departments often work together to improve outcomes and reduce the extra firefighters each would otherwise need to ensure enough coverage for all emergencies.

 
Experts reveal that clouds have moderated warming triggered by cl…

A new study has revealed how clouds are modifying the warming created by human-caused climate change in some parts of the world.

 
Clouds have moderated warming triggered by climate change…

Researchers have analyzed information contained in the rings of ancient pine trees from northern Scandinavia to reveal how clouds have reduced the impact of natural phases of warmth in the past and are doing so again now to moderate the warming caused by anthropogenic climate change.

 
Surge in cannabis use among youth preceded legalization in Canada…

National discussions on cannabis legalization, along with increased access to medical marijuana, may have encouraged more high school students to consume the drug years before it became legal in Canada.

 
Hubble captures birth of giant storm on Neptune…

Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope document the formation of a Great Dark Spot on Neptune for the first time, report researchers in a new study.

 
Why immunotherapy is not effective for some patients with metasta…

White blood cells known as B cells have been shown to be effective for predicting which cancer patients will respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, according to a new study.

 
A varied menu for the carnivorous waterwheel plant…

Biologists have for the first time reconstructed in detail the "menu" of the carnivorous waterwheel plant. This shows that the plant is not at all fussy about what it eats, and catches anything and everything that fits into its trap and triggers the snap mechanism.

 
A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all?

Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. Researchers now propose another approach that they believe would achieve wider access to care without triggering widespread opposition: a Medicare buy-in option for individuals under 65 years of age.

 
Removal of 'zombie cells' alleviates causes of diabetes in obese…

Researchers have shown that when senescent cells -- also known as 'zombie cells' -- are removed from fat tissue in obese mice, severity of diabetes and a range of its causes or consequences decline or disappear.

 
Continued PTSD in women exposed to deepwater horizon oil spill…

A study reports that women exposed to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (BP) Oil Spill continue to experience symptoms of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Less than half reported receiving past-year mental health treatment despite the high levels of PTSD symptoms, which suggests that many affected women may not be receiving needed mental health care.

 
Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells c…

Physicists have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria. Progress in this new field of study, which sits at the interface of math, physics, and biology, can help researchers better understand how individual-level metrics connect to population-level changes.

 
Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol i…

People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds. This means that health care providers may need to take special care when treating pain and mental health conditions in deaf and hard-of-hearing young adults, the researchers say.

 
Study questions value of genetic risk scores…

What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background. While a recent publication claimed that the GPS could be used by doctors to identify patients at high risk of conditions such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, a new study casts doubt on these claims.

 
Effective fear of heights treatment without a therapist using vir…

A fully self-guided treatment using virtual reality (VR) is effective in reducing fear of heights. A team of researchers developed ZeroPhobia, a treatment delivered through a smartphone app and a basic VR viewer.

 
Mothers of fussy babies at higher risk of depressive symptoms…

As FDA approval of the first postpartum depression drug hits the news, study looks at how infant fussiness and a baby's level of prematurity may influence the severity of maternal depressive symptoms.

 
New heart valve aimed at high-risk patients…

Researchers have created the first-ever nanocomposite biomaterial heart-valve developed to reduce or eliminate complications related to heart transplants. By using a newly developed technique, the researchers were able to build a more durable valve that enables the heart to adapt faster and more seamlessly.

 
Parasitic worms cause cancer -- and could help cure it…

Billions worldwide are infected with tropical worms. Unsurprisingly, most of these people live in poor countries, kept poor by the effects of worm-related malnourishment. What may surprise many is that worms also cause the majority of cases of some cancers in these countries.

 
Genetic variants may influence poststroke recovery…

Our genes may have a bearing not only on our stroke risk, but probably also on how well we recover after stroke. For the first time, scientists have identified common genetic variants that are associated with outcome after ischemic stroke.

 
Cesarean deliveries in India: Too many and yet too few…

Had India fallen prey to the epidemic of cesarean currently affecting many countries in the world?

 
Newly discovered Medusavirus give new insights on how organisms a…

Researchers find a new giant virus in the hot springs of northern Japan. It's unique genetic makeup of histones and capsid proteins brings new insight into virus evolution.

 
Icy giant planets in the laboratory…

Giant planets like Neptune may contain much less free hydrogen than previously assumed. Researchers drove shock waves through two different types of plastic to reach the same temperatures and pressures present inside such planets, and observed the behavior using ultra-strong X-ray laser pulses. Unexpectedly, one of these plastics kept its crystalline structure even at the most extreme pressures. Since the icy giant interiors are made up of the same components as the plastic, planetary models may need to be partially reconsidered.

 
Searching for missing anti-matter: A successful start to measurem…

The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan. Since March 25, 2019, the instrument has been measuring the first particle collisions, which are generated in the modernized SuperKEKB accelerator. The new duo produces more than 50 times the number of collisions compared to its predecessor. The huge increase in evaluable data means that there is not a greater chance of finding out why there is an imbalance between matter and anti-matter in the Universe.

 
Groin and hips of hockey players examined in five-second test…

Five seconds is enough to assess the status of a hockey player's groin. For the first time, a simple field test, called the five-second squeeze test, has been used on icehockey players to see if it can indicate current hip/groin function and hip muscle strength. According to the new study, there is a clear correlation between pain levels during the five second squeeze test and impaired sporting function as well as diminished hip muscle strength.

 
Drug diversity in bacteria…

Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms. Researchers demonstrate that they do so by modifying basic structures, similar to the approach taken in pharmaceutical research.

 
Scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells…

Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing artificial autotrophic cells, and may shed light on how primordial cells used sunlight as an energy source early in life's history.

 
The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of…

The study focuses on wild oats and is based on precision agriculture as well as the use of multispectral images.

 
Measurement of thoughts during knowledge acquisition…

How does the brain represent our knowledge of the world? Does it have a kind of map, similar to our sense of direction? And if so, how is it organized? Scientists have come one step closer to demonstrating the existence of such a mental navigation system.

 
'Technoference': We're more tired and less productive because of…

An Australian survey of 709 mobile phone users (aged 18 to 83) has found one in five women and one in eight men are losing sleep due to bad phone habits. The study identified other rising 'technoference' impacts, including physical aches and pains, and found 24% of women and 15% of men are now classified as ''problematic users''.

 
Engineering cellular function without living cells…

Scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells.

 
Tuck into colourful fruits and vegetables and see the light…

A $5.7 billion global medical bill to restore sight for the estimated 45 million people with cataracts could be slashed in half by a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, according to an international study.

 
New computational tool could change how we study pathogens…

A sophisticated new analysis too incorporating advanced mathematical strategies could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dangerous, fast-evolving disease vectors.

 
3D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better…

By generating 3D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased knowledge about the pollination process - once researchers are able to determine which flowers different bees see easily, and which ones they find it harder to distinguish.

 
Giving intravenous therapy to children at home is costly, lowers…

When treating patients, doctors sometimes overlook how their decisions impact a world they never see: a patient's home life. In the case of some serious infections in children, oral antimicrobial drugs are just as good at treating these ailments at home as the standard, intravenous medications. But according to new research, by-mouth medications excel in the important measure of preserving parents' quality of life.

 
Scientists squeeze catalysts inside host materials like a ship in…

Scientists have found a way to place catalysts inside the tiniest pores of different host materials, a bit like when model ships are unfolded inside a bottle.

 
Tissue engineering: Hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and…

Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) hydrogel has great potential as a cell-encapsulation delivery carrier for sustained release of paracrine factors and for tissue regeneration, with unique versatility for injection, scaffolding, and 3D bioprinting.

 
Detrimental effect of overlooking female athletes' nutritional ne…

As poor nutrition can negatively affect everything from bone to reproductive health, more attention needs to be paid to the specific nutritional needs of female athletes, researchers argue.

 
Aspirin to fight an expensive global killer infection…

Tuberculosis is far from eradicated around the world and still infects more than 1,400 people per year in Australia. Antibiotic resistant tuberculosis is particularly deadly and expensive to treat, costing up to $250,000 to treat a single case in Australia. Scientists have been working on new ways to treat tuberculosis by increasing the effectiveness of the immune system.

 
Does story time with an e-book change how parents and toddlers in…

Traditional print books may have an edge over e-books when it comes to quality time shared between parents and their children, a new study suggests.

 
Overland migration of Arctic Terns revealed…

Data from a landmark three year study of the world's longest migrating seabird reveals how overland migration is an integral part of their amazing journey.

 
New type of mobile tracking link shoppers' physical movements, bu…

A new study used a targeting strategy that tracks where, when, and for how long consumers are in a shopping mall to determine how shoppers' physical movements affect their economic choices. The study found that targeting potential customers in this way can significantly improve advertising via mobile phones.

 
NASA Mission Reveals Asteroid Has Big Surprises…

A NASA spacecraft that will return a sample of a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to Earth in 2023 made the first-ever close-up observations of particle plumes erupting from an asteroid’s surface.

 
NASA Television to Air Three Upcoming Spacewalks, Preview Briefin…

Four astronauts are preparing for their first spacewalks outside the International Space Station, scheduled for March 22, March 29 and April 8.

 
NASA Invites Media to 17th SpaceX Cargo Launch to Space Station…

Media accreditation now is open for the next SpaceX delivery of supplies, equipment and science investigations to the International Space Station.

 
NASA Astronauts Hague, Koch Arrive Safely at Space Station…

Three crew members have arrived safely at the International Space Station, following a successful launch and docking of their Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft Thursday.

 
NASA to Host Media Teleconference on Asteroid Sample Return Missi…

NASA is hosting a media teleconference at 1:30 p.m. EDT Tuesday, March 19, to announce new science from the agency’s first mission to return to Earth an asteroid sample that may contain unaltered material from the very beginning of our solar system.

 
NASA Administrator Statement on NASA’s Moon to Mars Plans, FY 2…

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine:

 
NASA Administrator Speaks at Robotics Competition in Oklahoma…

NASA Administrator, and Oklahoma native, Jim Bridenstine will be available to speak to media Saturday, March.

 
SpaceX Crew Dragon Splashdown Marks Success of First NASA Commerc…

NASA passed a major milestone Friday in its goal to restore America’s human spaceflight capability when SpaceX’s Crew Dragon returned to Earth after a five-day mission docked to the International Space Station.