Science & Technology Headlines

Eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound removes pollutants…

Scientists have developed a wastewater treatment process that uses a common agricultural byproduct to effectively remove pollutants and environmental hormones, which are known to be endocrine disruptors.

 
Geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet…

New radar technology allowed geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise.

 
Newly discovered neural pathway processes acute light to affect s…

Either to check the time or waste time, people often look at their smartphones after waking in the middle of the night. While this acute burst of light does make it more difficult to fall back to sleep, a new study reports that it won't interfere with the body's overall circadian rhythms.

 
Genetic similarities of osteosarcoma between dogs and children…

A bone cancer known as osteosarcoma is genetically similar in dogs and human children, according to the results of a new study. The findings could help break the logjam in the treatment of this deadly disease, which hasn't seen a significant medical breakthrough in nearly three decades.

 
Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches…

A team of researchers has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch. By investigating the composition of the tiny metal 'bridge' that forms inside the switch, their findings may spur the design of atomic switches with improved performance.

 
2016 US election linked to increase in preterm births among US La…

A significant jump in preterm births to Latina mothers living in the U.S. occurred in the nine months following the November 8, 2016 election of President Donald Trump, according to a new study.

 
Air pollution linked to increase in newborn intensive care admiss…

Infants born to women exposed to high levels of air pollution in the week before delivery are more likely to be admitted to a newborn intensive care unit (NICU), suggests a new analysis.

 
Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water…

A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. This could save 40 percent of the water consumed by more traditional methods, according to new research.

 
NASA sees Tropical Storm Danas track through the East China Sea…

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Danas moving through the East China Sea on July 19, 2019.

 
Geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet…

Greenland's more than 860,000 square miles are largely covered with ice and glaciers, and its melting fuels as much as one-third of the sea level rise in Florida. That's why a team of University of South Florida geoscientists' new discovery of one of the mechanisms that allows Greenland's glaciers to collapse into the sea has special significance for the Sunshine State.

 
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in…

Forests in Darien, an eastern province of Panama, are crucial for carbon storage, biodiversity conservation and the livelihoods of indigenous groups, yet they are under threat due to illegal logging. Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project, scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), McGill University and the National Research Council of Canada uncovered sources of above-ground biomass (AGB) variation and explored considerations for implementing Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) in Darien.

 
Coal-dependent Poland to compensate industry for carbon costs…

Poland's parliament on Friday adopted measures to compensate its industry struggling to cope with surging electricity bills triggered by higher EU carbon emission costs.

 
Virgin Orbit in launch deal with UK's Royal Air Force…

Virgin Orbit says it has been selected by the United Kingdom's Royal Air Force to provide launches of small satellites on short notice.

 
Bridging the nanoscale gap: A deep look inside atomic switches…

A team of researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology has gained unprecedented insight into the inner workings of an atomic switch. By investigating the composition of the tiny metal 'bridge' that forms inside the switch, their findings may spur the design of atomic switches with improved performance.

 
Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells…

Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the active site at the electrode based on microscope observations as the starting point. This better understanding could give clues on ways to improve performance and durability in future devices.

 
X-ray laser sight reveals drug targets…

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have published a review on serial femtosecond crystallography, one of the most promising methods for analyzing the tertiary structure of proteins. This technique has rapidly evolved over the past decade, opening new prospects for the rational design of drugs targeting proteins previously inaccessible to structural analysis. The article came out in the journal Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery.

 
Newly discovered biosynthetic pathway in bacteria recipe for drug…

Microbes are master chefs of the biomolecular world; collectively, they harbor the ability to produce a vast array of unknown substances, some of which may have therapeutic or other useful properties. In searching for useful products, a team of chemists at Illinois have discovered a whole new class of microbial recipes.

 
Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of ne…

A joint research group including Ryo Yoshida (Professor and Director of the Data Science Center for Creative Design and Manufacturing at the Institute of Statistical Mathematics [ISM], Research Organization of Information and Systems), Junko Morikawa (Professor at the School of Materials and Chemical Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology [Tokyo Tech]), and Yibin Xu (Group Leader of Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration, Research and Services Division of Materials Data and Integrated System [MaDIS], NIMS) has demonstrated the promising application of machine learning (ML)—a form of AI that enables computers to "learn" from given data—for discovering innovative materials.

 
An air-stable and waterproof lithium metal anode…

Lithium metal anode offers a promising pathway to upgrade the energy density of lithium ion batteries for its high specific capacity (3800 mAh g-1) and low voltage (-3.04 V vs. Li/Li+). But the safety issues caused by dendrite growth and instability in air caused by its high chemical activity limit its large-scale use as an electrode material. Lithium metal is highly sensitive to moisture and oxidative components in the air, leading to the generation of insulating products like lithium hydroxides on its surface and the resultant deterioration of the electrochemical performance. Moreover, when lithium contacts water, combustion and explosion can occur due to the production of hydrogen and heat. The sensitivity of lithium metal therefore necessitates demanding requirements for the transport, storage and process of lithium metal anode. It is hence highly desirable to develop an air-stable and waterproof lithium metal anode for potential use in the future.

 
Giant Hawaii telescope to focus on big unknowns of universe…

Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape galaxies?

 
Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack fo…

Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more - and may contribute to weight problems, a new study has found. The research also found that how snacks are presented (in a large or small container) has little influence on how much children snack.

 
France revises June temperature record up to 46 degrees…

An area in southern France in June recorded the country's first ever 46 degree temperature, the French state weather service said on Friday, revising up the country's all-time record reached in last month's heatwave.

 
China's space lab Tiangong 2 destroyed in controlled fall to eart…

China's Tiangong-2 space lab successfully re-entered the Earth's atmosphere Friday under controlled conditions, completing the latest round of experiments in Beijing's ambitious space programme.

 
Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common h…

Many nocturnal animals including insects use a species-specific smell, that is, a sex pheromone, to locate and attract potential mates. For example, female American cockroaches emit sex pheromones called "periplanones" with unique chemical structures. Males that detect them with their antennae orientate towards the pheromone source, preform courtship rituals, and mate.

 
Space research helps patients on Earth with low blood pressure co…

Ever stand up too quickly and see stars? Fainting from low blood pressure can be dangerous for astronauts as well as for patients. With the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaching, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers are publishing heart-related space research that helps us to understand the problem of low blood pressure.

 
Image: Palm oil plantations in Borneo as seen from orbit…

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over palm oil plantations in East Kalimantan—the Indonesian part of the island Borneo.

 
X-ray mapping enhances potential of lightweight magnesium…

A world-first study led by Monash University has discovered a technique and phenomenon that can be used for creating stronger, lightweight magnesium alloys that could improve structural integrity in the automobile and aerospace industries.

 
Cigarette butts hamper plant growth—study…

New research has discovered that cigarette butts—the most common form of litter on the planet—significantly reduce plant growth.

 
Still time for Scottish fishing industry to adapt to climate chan…

A University of Aberdeen scientist will present the findings of a report that shows although climate change is already having an impact on fish and fisheries globally, there is still time for the Scottish fishing industry to get better prepared to adapt to changes in fish growth and shifts in stock distribution.

 
Study finds huge disparities in participation in extra-curricular…

Children from the wealthiest backgrounds are three times more likely to take music classes out of school hours than those from the poorest families and there is a 20 percent participation gap in sport, new research shows.

 
Cigarette butts are the forgotten plastic pollution—and they co…

It's amazing how quickly people have ditched plastic straws thanks to campaigns to discourage us from using such "pointless plastic." Yet rarely do we hear about a much more common source of plastic pollution.

 
New wave of smart cities has arrived—and they're nothing like s…

An abandoned mine shaft beneath the town of Mansfield, England is an unlikely place to shape the future of cities. But here, researchers from the nearby University of Nottingham are planning to launch a "deep farm" that could produce ten times as much food as farms above ground. Deep farms are an example of what the latest wave of smart cities look like: putting people first by focusing on solving urban problems and improving existing infrastructure, rather than opening shiny new buildings.

 
Atomically precise models improve understanding of fuel cells…

Simulations from researchers in Japan provide new insights into the reactions occurring in solid-oxide fuel cells by using realistic atomic-scale models of the electrode active site based on microscope observations instead of the simplified and idealized atomic structures employed in previous studies. This better understanding of how the structures in the cells affect the reactions could give clues on ways to improve performance and durability in future devices.

 
Flexible user interface distribution for ubiquitous multi-device…

Researchers have developed mobile software platform technology that allows a mobile application (app) to be executed simultaneously and more dynamically on multiple smart devices. Its high flexibility and broad applicability can help accelerate a shift from the current single-device paradigm to a multiple one, which enables users to utilize mobile apps in ways previously unthinkable.

 
Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires…

The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown.

 
Shedding light on darker parts of our genetic heritage…

More than half of our genome consists of transposons, DNA sequences that are reminiscent of ancient, extinct viruses. Transposons are normally silenced by a process known as DNA methylation, but their activation can lead to serious diseases. Very little is known about transposons but researchers in an international collaboration project have now succeeded for the first time in studying what happens when DNA methylation is lost in human cells. These findings provide new insight into how changes in DNA methylation contribute to diseases.

 
Study shows relationship between type of delivery and twins' psyc…

A research team has analyzed for the first time the effect of the type of delivery on twins' psychological development and intelligence, demonstrating that cesarean section carries an independent risk in these multiple births.

 
Hearing loss tied with mental, physical, and social ailments in o…

Hearing loss has a profound impact on older people, as it can lead to anxiety, restricted activity, and perhaps even cognitive decline and dementia. Research has examined associations of hearing loss with outdoor activity limitations, psychological distress, and memory loss in people aged 65 and over. All three conditions were significantly worse when there was hearing loss. The findings support early interventions such as use of hearing aids.

 
Successful application of machine learning in the discovery of ne…

As a powerful example of how artificial intelligence (AI) can accelerate the discovery of new materials, scientists in Japan have designed and verified polymers with high thermal conductivity -- a property that would be the key to heat management, for example, in the fifth-generation (5G) mobile communication technologies. Their study highlights the great advantages of machine learning methods over traditional ways of searching for high-performance materials.

 
Understanding the mode of action of the primaquine: New insights…

Researchers have taken significant steps in understanding the way that the anti-malarial drug primaquine (PQ) works, which they hope will lead to the development of new, safer and more effective treatments for malaria.

 
Unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darie…

Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon.

 
3q29 deletion survey: Distinct social profile, high ASD risk…

3q29 deletion syndrome is a strong risk factor for both schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder. People with the rare condition have a distinct neuropsychiatric profile, researchers found.

 
How long does a surgery take? Researchers create model…

For years, surgeons have estimated how long a surgery will take. Now, researchers have created a model using data from more than 45k surgeries over four years.

 
This deep neural network fights deepfakes…

Researchers have developed a deep neural network architecture that can identify manipulated images at the pixel level with high precision by studying the boundaries of objects in the image.

 
Newly discovered biosynthetic pathway in bacteria recipe for drug…

Researchers have described a novel biochemical strategy used by bacteria to synthesize natural products.

 
X-ray mapping enhances potential of lightweight magnesium…

Engineers have discovered a technique for creating stronger, lightweight magnesium alloys. This finding could be of significant benefit to the automobile and aerospace industries.

 
Turkestan cockroach selling online is a companion of the common h…

The Turkestan cockroach (commonly known as the red runner roach or rusty red roach), which is popular as food for pet reptiles, has an interneuron extremely sensitive to sex pheromones emitted by American cockroaches, providing evidence that the Turkestan cockroach is phylogenetically close to the American cockroach and the smoky brown cockroach belonging to the genus Periplaneta.

 
Boosting the discovery of new drugs to treat spinal cord injuries…

A research team led by Leonor Saúde, Principal Investigator at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, in partnership with the company Technophage, SA, has designed a simple and efficient platform that uses zebrafish to discover and identify new drugs to treat spinal cord lesions. This study is the proof-of-concept for the use of this zebrafish platform that, combined with drug repurposing, has the potential to accelerate the translation period from the discovery to the clinics.

 
Fishing for genes…

Just as steelhead trout migrate from saltwater to freshwater and back, MBARI's Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs)—first developed for research in the ocean—have been getting a lot of use in freshwater over the last five years.

 
What is leptospirosis and how can it harm us and our pets?

Recently reported cases of the often fatal bacterial infection leptospirosis in dogs in Sydney have raised the issue of animal diseases that also affect humans.

 
Making catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connect…

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and possible uses of their results. Jeff Van Raden, and Ramesh Jasti with the University of Oregon, have published a Perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue.

 
NASA Coverage of Vice President’s Visit to Kennedy Space Center…

NASA will provide television, still image, and social media coverage of Vice President Mike Pence’s visit to the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday, July 20 – the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing.

 
Yes, I'm searching for aliens—and no, I won't be going to Area…

What started as an internet joke has generated a stern military warning after more than a million people "signed up" to "raid" Area 51—a secretive military installation in Southern Nevada long fancied by conspiracy theorists to be hiding evidence of a crashed UFO with aliens. The purpose of the planned raid is in order to "see them aliens." In the following Q&A, astronomy professor Jason Wright discusses the public's interest in answering the age-old question: Are we alone?

 
Largest genomic study on type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan African p…

Researchers have performed the largest GWAS study on type 2 diabetes in the sub-Saharan African populations, revealing an association between the disease and previously unlinked ZRANB3 gene. By using animal models, their results show that dysfunction of the ZRANB3 gene has major repercussions on insulin production. This link may hold key answers to the treatment of type 2 diabetes in all populations.

 
Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they exercise in spac…

Up to two hours of endurance and resistance exercises daily during a long space flight mission, combined with IV fluid replacement after landing, helps astronauts prevent dizziness and fainting during normal activity when they return to Earth. The study findings also have implications for a variety of people with health conditions that cause them to faint when standing up, and people on bed rest for long periods.

 
Transfer of oncogene in colon cancer cells demonstrated…

For years, doctors and scientists have known very little about why patients can receive drugs successfully for months, or even years, before developing a drug resistance. Now researchers propose that there is a cellular as well as molecular cause to this phenomenon in colon cancer, with potential application to other similarly aggressive cancers as well.

 
Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse…

Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge.

 
Maternal race not a factor for children experiencing a 'language…

Researchers have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of the words mothers use with their children, or with the language skills their children later develop.

 
Many of the deadliest cancers receive the least amount of researc…

Many of the deadliest or most common cancers get the least amount of nonprofit research funding, reports a new study. 'Embarrassing' or stigmatized cancers, like lung and liver, are underfunded. Colon, endometrial, liver and bile duct, cervical, ovarian, pancreatic and lung cancers were all poorly funded compared to how common they are and how many deaths they cause, the study found. In contrast, breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma and pediatric cancers were all well-funded, respective to their impact on society.

 
Alzheimer's gene may impact cognitive health before adulthood…

A psychologist asserts that those carrying the APOE4 gene score lower on IQ tests during childhood and adolescence. And the effect was stronger in girls than in boys. APOE4 carriers are up to three times more likely to develop late-onset Alzheimer's disease, which occurs in people 65 and older.

 
Researchers use Twitter and AI to see who is hitting the gym…

A new study used machine learning to find and comb through exercise-related tweets from across the United States, unpacking regional and gender differences in exercise types and intensity levels.

 
Metal oxide-infused membranes could offer low-energy alternative…

Researchers are working on membranes that could separate chemicals without using energy-intensive distillation processes.

 
Gene linked to severe liver damage…

Researchers have found that a gene known as AEBP1 may play a central role in the development, severity and potential treatment of liver disease. One of the study's major findings is that AEBP1 regulates the expression of a network of at least nine genes related to fibrosis: AKR1B10, CCDC80, DPT, EFEMP1, ITGBL1, LAMC3, MOXD1, SPP1, and STMN2.

 
Low doses of radiation promote cancer-capable cells…

New research finds that low doses of radiation equivalent to three CT scans, which are considered safe, give cancer-capable cells a competitive advantage over normal cells.

 
Access to contraception not 'silver bullet' to stem population gr…

The population of sub-Saharan Africa is set to double by 2050, yet a new study challenges a common misconception that this is caused solely by inadequate family planning.

 
'Crystal clocks' used to time magma storage before volcanic erupt…

The molten rock that feeds volcanoes can be stored in the Earth's crust for as long as a thousand years, a result which may help with volcanic hazard management and better forecasting of when eruptions might occur.

 
New laws of attraction: Scientists print magnetic liquid droplets…

Scientists have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. The new material could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.

 
New low-cost thermoelectric material works at room temperature…

The widespread adoption of thermoelectric devices that can directly convert electricity into thermal energy for cooling and heating has been hindered, in part, by the lack of materials that are both inexpensive and highly efficient at room temperature. Now researchers have reported the discovery of a new material that works efficiently at room temperature while requiring almost no costly tellurium, a major component of the current state-of-the-art material.

 
Scientists stimulate neurons to induce particular perceptions in…

Hallucinations are spooky and, fortunately, fairly rare. But, a new study suggests, the real question isn't so much why some people occasionally experience them. It's why all of us aren't hallucinating all the time.

 
Toward molecular computers: First measurement of single-molecule…

Heat transfer through a single molecule has been measured for the first time by an international team of researchers.

 
Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'…

Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? Part of the reason is bombardment by the female immune system, which very few sperm survive. Researchers have discovered a molecular handshake between sperm and uterine cells that may help sperm evade this attack -- or may help the immune system target the weakest sperm.

 
Cleaning our water with groundbreaking 'bioinspired' chemistry…

Synthetic chemicals, including pesticides, medications and household cleaners, often end up in our waterways. Even in small amounts these substances can affect wildlife, plants and humans, and a number of them have shown resistance to normal water treatment methods. Researchers blazed the trail for a new field of sustainable chemistry by unveiling powerful, safe and inexpensive oxidation catalysts inspired by biological processes that break down even the most stubborn micropollutants.

 
Visceral leishmaniasis diagnostic tests…

Accurate and timely diagnosis of the tropic disease visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the pillars for reducing VL deaths. Currently available serological tests for diagnosing VL vary widely in their performance and may, as a whole, be inadequate for VL diagnosis, researchers report.

 
SIRT6 over-expression may prevent progression of diabetes, study…

A new animal study explores an alternative sirtuin-based therapy to block the development of obesity and cardiomyopathy under conditions of excess nutrition, when diet restriction and regular exercise are not feasible.

 
Jurassic fossil shows how early mammals could swallow like their…

The 165-million-year-old fossil of Microdocodon gracilis, a tiny, shrew-like animal, shows the earliest example of modern hyoid bones in mammal evolution.

 
Simulation explores how insects glean compass direction from skyl…

A computational simulation suggests that insects may be capable of using the properties of light from the sky to determine their compass direction with an error of less than two degrees.

 
Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can increase men's risk of…

Aging men with low testosterone levels who take testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) are at a slightly greater risk of experiencing an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or myocardial infarction, especially during the first two years of use, reports a new study. The findings confirm concerns voiced by many health agencies about the potential risks associated with the treatment.

 
Link found between gut bacteria, successful joint replacement…

Having healthy gut flora -- the trillions of bacteria housed in our intestines -- could lower the risk of infection following knee and hip replacement surgeries, while an unhealthy intestinal flora may increase the risk of infection.

 
New pathways for sensory learning in the brain…

Researchers have developed an automated, robotic training device that allows mice to learn at their leisure. The technology stands to further neuroscience research by allowing researchers to train animals under more natural conditions and identify mechanisms of circuit rewiring that occur during learning.

 
A sharper focus: New computational technique resolves compressed…

With high-energy X-rays, such as those that will be produced by the upgrade to Argonne's Advanced Photon Source comes a potential hitch -- the more penetrating the X-rays are, the higher a likelihood that researchers could run into problems with the image data. In a new study, researchers have found a novel way to combat this image degradation.

 
Study finds key metabolic changes in patients with chemotherapy-a…

Researchers embarked on a study to investigate whether early changes in energy-related metabolites in the blood -- measured shortly after chemotherapy -- could be used to identify patients who developed heart toxicity at a later time.

 
How low oxygen builds a bigger, stronger alligator heart…

Researchers are beginning to understand why some alligators develop stronger hearts after enduring low oxygen during early development in the egg.

 
Physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions…

Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. The findings, surprisingly by physicists, suggest that the subliminal state is the most robust part of the conscious network.

 
Coaching scientists to play well together…

When scientists from different disciplines collaborate -- as is increasingly necessary to confront the complexity of challenging research problems -- interpersonal tussles often arise. One scientist may accuse another of stealing her ideas. Or, a researcher may feel he is not getting credit for his work or doesn't have access to important data. A free, online training tool, teamscience.net, has been proven to develop skills to work with other scientists outside their own discipline.

 
Lionfish ear-bones reveal a more mobile invasion…

Researchers have little information about how grown lionfish might invade or move to new waters because tracking small marine organisms poses difficulties. One way to investigate their movements, though, is to study stable isotopes in their ear-bones.

 
New research identifies gene that hides cancer cells from immunot…

A team has identified a gene that could make immunotherapy treatments, specifically checkpoint inhibitors, work for a wider variety of cancer patients. The study found that when the DUX4 gene is expressed in cancer cells, it can prevent the cancer from being recognized and destroyed by the immune system.

 
Tiny vibration-powered robots are the size of the world's smalles…

Researchers have created a new type of tiny 3D-printed robot that moves by harnessing vibration from piezoelectric actuators, ultrasound sources or even tiny speakers. Swarms of these 'micro-bristle-bots' might work together to sense environmental changes, move materials -- or perhaps one day repair injuries inside the human body.

 
Women now seen as equally as or more competent than men…

Women have come a long way in the United States over the last 70 years, to the point where they are now seen as being as competent as men, if not more so, according to new research.

 
NASA Adds Events to Celebration of 50th Anniversary of Historic M…

​NASA is offering new opportunities, in addition to those announced July 2, for America to celebrate with the agency the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 Moon mission and look to the future of exploration on the Moon and Mars.

 
NASA to Broadcast Next Space Station Resupply Launch, Prelaunch A…

NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting 7:35 p.m. EDT Sunday, July 21, for the launch of its 18th agency-contracted resupply mission to the International Space Station. Live coverage will begin on NASA Television and the agency’s website Sunday with prelaunch events.

 
NASA Awards Contract for Infrastructure Support Services…

NASA has awarded eight contracts for architect-engineering services in support of the Facilities Infrastructure Division at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

 
NASA Funds Demo of 3D-Printed Spacecraft Parts Made, Assembled in…

NASA has awarded a $73.7 million contract to Made In Space, Inc. of Mountain View, California, to demonstrate the ability of a small spacecraft, called Archinaut One, to manufacture and assemble spacecraft components in low-Earth orbit. The in-space robotic manufacturing and assembly technologies could be important for America’s Moon to Mars explor

 
NASA to Broadcast Launch, Arrival of Astronaut Andrew Morgan at S…

A multinational crew of space travelers, including NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan, is scheduled to arrive at the International Space Station on Saturday, July 20 – the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s historic landing on the Moon. NASA Television and the agency’s website will provide live coverage of the crew’s launch and arrival.

 
NASA Administrator to Talk Moon Landing Anniversary, Moon to Mars…

Just days before the 50th anniversary of one of humanity’s greatest achievements – astronauts first walking on the Moon – NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT on Monday, July 15.

 
NASA, NOAA Invite Media to Preview Study of Fires’ Impact on US…

Media are invited to a behind-the-scenes tour of a joint field campaign led by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to study the impacts of U.S. wildfires and agricultural fires on air quality and climate.

 
NASA Awards Launch Services Contract for Groundbreaking Astrophys…

NASA has selected SpaceX of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) mission, which will allow astronomers to discover, for the first time, the hidden details of some of the most exotic astronomical objects in our universe.

 
Media Invited to News Conference, Interviews with Next Space Stat…

NASA astronaut Jessica Meir, along with crewmates Oleg Skripochka of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and Hazzaa Ali Almansoori of the United Arab Emirates, a Roscosmos spaceflight participant, will discuss the upcoming Expeditions 60 and 61 crew increments aboard the International Space Station at a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT Monday, July 15,